Subchorionic hemorrhage

In pregnancy, some types of bleeding are a big issue, while others are not. Subchorionic bleeding is just one type of bleeding. Some cases can become serious, while others don’t adversely affect the pregnancy. But it’s important to call your doctor right away when you experience any form of vaginal bleeding.

Subchorionic bleeding occurs when the placenta detaches from the original site of implantation. This is called a subchorionic hemorrhage or hematoma. It affects the chorionic membranes. These membranes lift apart and form another sac between the placenta and the uterus. The movement and resulting clots are what cause this type of bleeding.

These hematomas can range in size, with the smallest being most common. Larger versions can cause heavier bleeding.

Bleeding that goes beyond a few spots and requires a panty liner is often a sign of something else. Subchorionic bleeding is one such possibility. Bleeding tends to be the only sign or symptom of subchorionic hematoma. You may not even realize you have one until your doctor performs an ultrasound.

If a diagnosis of vaginal bleeding is deemed subchorionic, then your doctor will likely start treatments to prevent miscarriage. Options may include progesterone or dydrogesterone. If the hematomas are large, you may also be ordered to:

  • stay in bed (bed rest)
  • avoid standing for long periods of time
  • avoid sex
  • avoid exercise
  • http://www.healthline.com/health/pregnancy/subchorionic-bleeding#1