Reducing salt intake can prevent high blood pressure.

      Reducing Sodium Intake

High blood pressure is one of the primary risks when it comes to too much sodium intake. Elevated blood pressure is a condition that can lead to other problems that can threaten one’s life, such as kidney disease, heart disease, or even heart failure. Excess sodium does this by causing water retention, which puts a strain on the arteries, kidneys, and heart. According to the latest dietary guidelines for Americans, people who are 2 years old or older should keep their daily sodium intake below 2,300 mg.

Certain people, including people with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or high blood pressure, should limit their daily sodium consumption to 1,500 mg. This lower sodium intake is also recommended for African Americans and people who are 51 years old or older. People get sodium from a number of sources, most commonly salt. In addition to salt, sodium comes from sources that include baking soda and baking powder. Salt is added to many foods, particularly those that are processed and prepackaged.

Ask for unsalted french fries to reduce sodium intake

To reduce salt intake, people must check the labels of the foods that they purchase, which will tell them how much is in the product. They should also avoid foods that have the word “salted” in the name and purchase items that are low-sodium or have no salt added. Canned foods, frozen dinners, hot dogs, and luncheon meats are all examples of foods that contain heavy amounts of salt. People can also limit the amount of salt that they add when cooking at home by using herbs and spices as flavor substitutes. Using fresh vegetables and fruits is also a way to cut back on sodium

Drink water, Live Longer

7 Science-Based Health Benefits of Drinking Enough Water

Our bodies are around 60% water, give or take.

It is commonly recommended to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day (the 8×8 rule).

Although there is little science behind this specific rule, staying hydrated is important.

Here are 7 evidence-based health benefits of drinking plenty of water.


1. Water Helps to Maximize Physical Performance
If we do not stay hydrated, physical performance can suffer.

This is particularly important during intense exercise or high heat.

Dehydration can have a noticeable effect if you lose as little as 2% of your body’s water content. However, it is not uncommon for athletes to lose up to 6-10% of their water weight via sweat.

This can lead to altered body temperature control, reduced motivation, increased fatigue and make exercise feel much more difficult, both physically and mentally.

Optimal hydration has been shown to prevent this from happening, and may even reduce the oxidative stress that occurs during high intensity exercise. This is not surprising when you consider that muscle is about 80% water.

So, if you exercise intensely and tend to sweat, then staying hydrated can help you perform at your absolute best.


2. Hydration Has a Major Effect on Energy Levels and Brain Function
Your brain is strongly influenced by hydration status.

Studies show that even mild dehydration (1-3% of body weight) can impair many aspects of brain function.

In a study of young women, fluid loss of 1.36% after exercise impaired both mood and concentration, and increased the frequency of headaches.

Another similar study, this time in young men, showed that fluid loss of 1.59% was detrimental to working memory and increased feelings of anxiety and fatigue.

A 1-3% fluid loss equals about 1.5-4.5 lbs (0.5-2 kg) of body weight loss for a 150 lbs (68 kg) person. This can easily occur through normal daily activities, let alone during exercise or high heat.

Many other studies, ranging from children to the elderly, have shown that mild dehydration can impair mood, memory and brain performance.


3. Drinking Water May Help to Prevent and Treat Headaches
Dehydration can trigger headaches and migraines in some individuals.

Several studies have shown that water can relieve headaches in those who are dehydrated.

However, this appears to depend on the type of headache.

One study of 18 people found that water had no effect on the frequency of headaches, but did reduce the intensity and duration somewhat.


4. Drinking More Water May Help Relieve Constipation
Constipation is a common problem, characterized by infrequent bowel movements and difficulty passing stool.

Increasing fluid intake is often recommended as a part of the treatment protocol, and there is some evidence to back this up.

Low water consumption appears to be a risk factor for constipation in both young and elderly individuals.

Carbonated water shows particularly promising results for constipation relief, although the reason is not entirely understood.


5. Drinking Water May Help Treat Kidney Stones
Urinary stones are painful clumps of mineral crystal that form in the urinary system.

The most common form is kidney stones, which form in the kidneys.

There is limited evidence that water intake can help prevent recurrence in people who have previously gotten kidney stones.

Higher fluid intake increases the volume of urine passing through the kidneys, which dilutes the concentration of minerals, so they are less likely to crystallize and form clumps.

Water may also help prevent the initial formation of stones, but studies are required to confirm this.


6. Water Helps Prevent Hangovers
A hangover refers to the unpleasant symptoms experienced after drinking alcohol.

Alcohol is a diuretic, so it makes you lose more water than you take in. This can lead to dehydration.

Although dehydration is not the main cause of hangovers, it can cause symptoms like thirst, fatigue, headache and dry mouth.

A good way to reduce hangovers is to drink a glass of water between drinks, and to have at least one big glass of water before going to bed.


7. Drinking More Water Can Help With Weight Loss
Drinking plenty of water can help you lose weight.

This is due to the fact that water can increase satiety and boost your metabolic rate.

In two studies, drinking half a liter (17 ounces) of water was shown to increase metabolism by 24-30% for up to 1.5 hours.

This means that drinking 2 liters of water every day can increase your total energy expenditure by up to 96 calories per day.

The timing is important too, and drinking water half an hour before meals is the most effective. It can make you feel more full, so that you eat fewer calories.

In one study, dieters who drank half a liter of water before meals lost 44% more weight, over a period of 12 weeks.

It is actually best to drink water cold, because then the body will use additional energy (calories) to heat the water to body temperature.







Diabetes: Don’t cut corners, get help


The costs of managing diabetes can take their toll. A year’s worth of routine care — medication, glucose test strips, syringes, and other supplies, as well as doctor appointments — can run about

$6,000. And that doesn’t include the costs for any complications.


However, cutting back on tests or treatments to save money may compromise your efforts to control your condition, according to one study. More than half of the people who were unsuccessful in managing their condition said they had put off going to a doctor, didn’t fill a prescription, or tried other cost-cutting measures.


Instead of skimping on care, get the most for your healthcare dollars. Check your health plan. Many insurance companies offer disease-management programs for people with diabetes so they can take control of their condition and reduce any health issues.


Many disease management programs offer 24/7access to a registered nurse. “Advice nurses” usually provide general tips on managing diabetes. Many have access to your medical records, so they can provide personalized recommendations.


Also, ask your pharmacist or health plan about lower cost glucose monitor and test strip combinations. Sometimes, an inexpensive monitor and more costly test strips can add up to higher costs than if you buy a more expensive monitor with less expensive test strips. Ask your doctor about whether she or he can suggest lower cost, equally effective medications to control your diabetes.

Why Is This Flu Season So Deadly?

According to, This flu season is fierce and has already claimed the lives of at least 37 children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There were 11,965 laboratory-confirmed flu-related hospitalizations reported from October 1 to January 20. The number of people infected with influenza is believed to be much higher because not everyone goes to their doctor when they are sick, nor do doctors test every patient.

Added to those scary stats, the World Health Organization estimates that annual flu epidemics result in about 3 to 5 million cases of severe illness globally and 290,000 to 650,000 deaths. Although the fever and aches may feel terrible, most of us don’t die from the flu. So how exactly does this common illness lead to so many dying? “Influenza and its complications disproportionately affect people who are 65 and older. They account for 80% of the deaths,” said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University.

But young children and people who have an underlying illness, such as heart disease, lung disease or diabetes, are susceptible to dying from the flu as well, he said. There are three ways adults can succumb to Pneumonia.

What is pneumonia?

“The usual flu death is a person who gets influenza, gets all that inflammation in their chest, and then has the complication of pneumonia,” explained Schaffner, who added that this is a “long, drawn-out process.”
Pneumonia is an infection that causes the small air sacs of the lungs to fill with fluid or pus. Though this is the most common route to death, flu can be fatal for more unusual reasons.

Click here for flu prevention


Source- cnn

Grace ER - Flu Shots

2018 Flu Season

Stop by our nearest Location and get vaccinated TODAY!


Who should get vaccinated this season?

Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every season. Vaccination to prevent influenza is particularly important for people who are at high risk of serious complications from influenza. Flu vaccination has important benefits. It can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations.

Different flu vaccines are approved for use in different groups of people. Factors that can determine a person’s suitability for vaccination, or vaccination with a particular vaccine, include a person’s age, health (current and past) and any relevant allergies. Flu shots are approved for use in pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions.  There are flu shots that also are approved for use in people as young as 6 months of age and up.

CDC recommends use of the flu shot (inactivated influenza vaccine or IIV) and the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not be used during 2016-2017.

Here are some helpful tips for this flu season

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone for 24 hours without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

  • If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can be used to treat your illness.
  • Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter.
  • Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For people with high-risk factors, treatment with an antiviral drug can mean the difference between having a milder illness versus a very serious illness that could result in a hospital stay.
  • Studies show that flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when they are started within 2 days of getting sick, but starting them later can still be helpful, especially if the sick person has a high-risk health condition or is very sick from the flu. Follow your doctor’s instructions for taking this drug.
  • Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a fever.
Source –
24-hour emergency care in Houston

Walk in to a 24-hour emergency care clinic in Houston

Walk in to a 24-hour emergency care clinic in Houston

How many times have you been in a situation where you found a person who had gotten into an accident and you tried to take them to the nearby hospital just to get stuck in the waiting area? Have you ever been in a situation where a family member suffered abrupt severe pain or fainted late at night?

Grace ER is a 24-hour emergency care in Houston that helps people anytime and every time. Such emergency care clinics are saving the lives of people who saw it slip away without proper, timely care. Here are the advantages of a 24-hour emergency care in Houston like Grace ER

  • Easy Access: This walk-in clinic in Houston is easily accessible. Easy and comfortable access to their medical facilities and treatment is a big time saver for patients.
  • No Wait: The biggest advantage of this walk-in clinic in Houston is that there is no need to wait to receive treatment or medication. Physicians and medical facilities are managed efficiently, which makes the system easily accessible to patients. They don’t need to wait in line to take care of paperwork. Once the patient is admitted to the clinic, they are directly taken to the exam room.
  • Always Open: You don’t need to wait until a certain time if you are suffering from an illness or you require immediate treatment at night. Illness does not wait for the physician, and walk-in clinics understand this and provide 24-hour service to their patients. There will always be physicians available, as they work on a shift basis so that they are available for patients at any time.
  • Fewer Formalities: Compared to traditional clinics, you will find that the formalities and the paperwork are kept to a minimum in urgent care clinics. Treatment of the patient is not put on hold for the sake of completing their records. There is a team of professionals who maintain records of who is visiting the clinic and when, and patient records are completed at a later time.

Urgent care or emergency room?



In a life-threatening situation, a call to 911 or a visit to an emergency room is always your best choice. For minor illnesses at times when you can’t see your own doctor, like weekends or evenings, an urgent care clinic or a trip to a standalone ER such as Grace ER can give you the care you need. Grace ER has locations in Houston and Pearland, TX.

Research the urgent care options available on your health plan. These guidelines can help you decide if you or someone else needs emergency attention:



  • Chest pain with shortness of breath and/or sweating
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Uncontrollable bleeding
  • Trauma or head injury
  • Sudden dizziness, difficulty seeing, slurred speech, confusion, numbness, or paralysis
  • Unconsciousness
  • Poisoning
  • Severe injury, burns, or electrical shock
  • Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy

Standalone ER/ URGENT CARE

  • Sore throats, coughs, congestion, fever, and other flu or cold symptoms
  • Cuts that require stitches
  • Mild or moderate asthma attacks
  • Earaches and eye or skin infections*
  • Insect bites or rashes
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Sprains, strains, deep bruises
  • Diarrhea*
  • Pregnancy tests and physical exams



If any of these symptoms seem severe, always consider them an emergency room.

Sprained Ankle

A sprained ankle is an injury that occurs when you roll, twist or turn your ankle in an awkward way. This can stretch or tear the tough bands of tissue (ligaments) that help hold your ankle bones together.

Ligaments help stabilize joints, preventing excessive movement. A sprained ankle occurs when the ligaments are forced beyond their normal range of motion. Most sprained ankles involve injuries to the ligaments on the outer side of the ankle.Treatment for a sprained ankle depends on the severity of the injury. Although self-care measures and over-the-counter pain medications may be all you need, a medical evaluation might be necessary to reveal how badly you’ve sprained your ankle and to determine the appropriate treatment.


Signs and symptoms of a sprained ankle vary depending on the severity of the injury. They may include:

  • Pain, especially when you bear weight on the affected foot
  • Tenderness when you touch the ankle
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Restricted range of motion
  • Instability in the ankle
  • Popping sensation or sound at the time of injury

Call your doctor if you have pain and swelling in your ankle and you suspect a sprain. Self-care measures may be all you need, but talk to your doctor to discuss whether you should have your ankle evaluated. If signs and symptoms are severe, you may have significant damage to a ligament or a broken bone in your ankle or lower leg.


Factors that increase your risk of a sprained ankle include:

  • Sports participation. Ankle sprains are a common sports injury, particularly in sports that require jumping, cutting action, or rolling or twisting of the foot such as basketball, tennis, football, soccer and trail running.
  • Uneven surfaces. Walking or running on uneven surfaces or poor field conditions may increase the risk of an ankle sprain.
  • Prior ankle injury. Once you’ve sprained your ankle or had another type of ankle injury, you’re more likely to sprain it again.
  • Poor physical condition. Poor strength or flexibility in the ankles may increase the risk of a sprain when participating in sports.
  • Improper shoes. Shoes that don’t fit properly or aren’t appropriate for an activity, as well as high-heeled shoes in general, make ankles more vulnerable to injury.


Failing to treat a sprained ankle properly, engaging in activities too soon after spraining your ankle or spraining your ankle repeatedly might lead to the following complications:

  • Chronic ankle pain
  • Chronic ankle joint instability
  • Arthritis in the ankle joint


The following tips can help you prevent a sprained ankle or a recurring sprain:

  • Warm up before you exercise or play sports.
  • Be careful when walking, running or working on an uneven surface.
  • Use an ankle support brace or tape on a weak or previously injured ankle.
  • Wear shoes that fit well and are made for your activity.
  • Minimize wearing high-heeled shoes.
  • Don’t play sports or participate in activities for which you are not conditioned.
  • Maintain good muscle strength and flexibility.
  • Practice stability training, including balance exercises.

Sugar, oh sugar, sugar


Sugar is sweet, but too much might have souring effects on your body. In fact too much sugar intake can lead to illnesses and complications that often lead people to the Emergency Room. To maintain good health, one needs to maintain a healthy diet.


Sugar is a simple carbohydrate that naturally occurs in many foods such as in fruits (fructose) and milk products (lactose).


These sugars provide us with the nutrients and calories our bodies need. When we eat too many added sugars — such as white sugar, honey, corn syrup, and molasses — we may start to see side effects.


Some signs that you are getting too much sugar from empty calories include weight gain, elevated cholesterol, and cavities.


There are many ways to reduce added sugar in your diet:


  • Eat more fruits and vegetables.


  • Drink fewer sugar-sweetened beverages, and keep in check how much 100% fruit juices and alcoholic beverages you drink.


  • Eat fewer and smaller portions of items containing added sugars.


  • Limit using added sugar to improve the flavor of foods.


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